As many Americans plan trips to lakes and river this Labor Day Weekend, experts are sending out a warning to watch out for toxic algae blooms.

Researchers identified 318 bodies away in the US that have been infected by the microscopic organism called cyanobacteria.

Approximately 86 percent of the outbreaks were in recreational areas, but other reports note a number of dogs and cows were killed.

Data shows that there are less blooms than last year, but wildlife officials due to the coronavirus pandemic they were unable to test for toxins in many bodies of water.

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Researchers identified 318 bodies  away in the US that have been infected by the microscopic organism called cyanobacteria.

Researchers identified 318 bodies  away in the US that have been infected by the microscopic organism called cyanobacteria.

Researchers identified 318 bodies  away in the US that have been infected by the microscopic organism called cyanobacteria.

Algae blooms, although aesthetic pleasing, are harmful because they are home to toxin-producing organisms is destructive to both humans and the environment.

Algal blooms, although aesthetic pleasing, are harmful because they are home to toxin-producing phytoplankton, which is destructive to both humans and the environment.

Long linked to animal deaths, high doses of the toxins in humans can cause liver damage and attack the nervous system.

The Environment Working Group (EWG), a non-profit organizations, released a report as a warning ahead of the holiday weekend in the US. 

Approximately 86 percent of the outbreaks were in recreational areas, but other reports note a number of dogs and cows were killed. Pictured is a bloom in Pyramid Lake located in Nevada

Approximately 86 percent of the outbreaks were in recreational areas, but other reports note a number of dogs and cows were killed. Pictured is a bloom in Pyramid Lake located in Nevada

Approximately 86 percent of the outbreaks were in recreational areas, but other reports note a number of dogs and cows were killed. Pictured is a bloom in Pyramid Lake located in Nevada

There were 419 blooms identified in 2019, which is 98 more than the current year, but is due to many states unable to test every body of water in toxins

There were 419 blooms identified in 2019, which is 98 more than the current year, but is due to many states unable to test every body of water in toxins

There were 419 blooms identified in 2019, which is 98 more than the current year, but is due to many states unable to test every body of water in toxins

The team has been tracking outbreaks over a decade, but notes reports are down this year due to cutbacks in states amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Many of the bodies of water hit by blooms are for recreational use, but experts note there has been eight locations that have killed animals – seven killed dogs and one wiped out nine head of cattle.

There were 419 blooms identified in 2019, which is 98 more than the current year, but is due to many states unable to test every body of water in toxins.

EWG notes that the Utah Department of Environmental Quality tested 60 lakes and rivers previous years, but was only able to do 18 in 2020.

Reports of the toxic algae have increased since 2010, which saw less than 100 blooms reported. Anne Schechinger, EWG senior economic analyst, said: ‘We really think a big driver of this is climate change

Reports of the toxic algae have increased since 2010, which saw less than 100 blooms reported. Anne Schechinger, EWG senior economic analyst, said: ‘We really think a big driver of this is climate change

Reports of the toxic algae have increased since 2010, which saw less than 100 blooms reported. Anne Schechinger, EWG senior economic analyst, said: ‘We really think a big driver of this is climate change

Erica Gaddis, the department’s director, said: ‘Those 18 are largely state parks.’

‘They’re really the areas where the public is most likely to interact directly with the water body, and where we’ve had issues of algal blooms in the past.’

Reports of the toxic algae have increased since 2010, which saw less than 100 blooms reported.

Anne Schechinger, EWG senior economic analyst, said: ‘We really think a big driver of this is climate change.’

‘Algae blooms flourish and occur more frequently when nutrients like phosphorous and nitrogen wash into water bodies and combine with heat and sunlight.’

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