Natasha Sale (pictured) has died after she fought to have the cervical cancer screening age lowered from 25 to 18 

Natasha Sale (pictured) has died after she fought to have the cervical cancer screening age lowered from 25 to 18 

Natasha Sale (pictured) has died after she fought to have the cervical cancer screening age lowered from 25 to 18 

A young mother who led a campaign for the cervical cancer screening age to be lowered has died aged 31.

Brave Natasha Sale launched an online petition which called for the screening age to be reduced from 25 to 18.

The mother-of-four died on December 28th in Torbay Hospital in Devon, six days after her 31st birthday, after first being diagnosed aged 28 in 2016.

Mrs Sale, from Chudleigh, endured 25 rounds of radiotherapy and six chemotherapy treatments after being diagnosed with stage three cervical cancer.

She was given the devastating news that the cancer had spread to her peritoneum and lung and was incurable three months after her treatment.

Despite being given between 12 and 15 months to live in August 2018, her condition quickly deteriorated.

As she fought cancer, she lobbied the Government about the screening age and to raise awareness, garnering more than 80,000 signatures in an online petition. If it reaches more than 100,000 it will be considered for debate in Parliament.

Natasha Sale (pictured in hospital during her treatment) was first diagnosed aged 28 and campaigned for the smear testing age to be lowered

Natasha Sale (pictured in hospital during her treatment) was first diagnosed aged 28 and campaigned for the smear testing age to be lowered

Natasha Sale (pictured in hospital during her treatment) was first diagnosed aged 28 and campaigned for the smear testing age to be lowered

Mrs Sale said in August: ‘By reducing the age of smear tests and cervical screening today we can save lives, we can tackle cell changes early and prevent cervical cancer.’

‘If I can do anything with my life I want to make this change happen. It’s too late for me but it’s not too late for the next generation of young ladies.’

Her friends and fellow campaigners adopted the name Natasha’s Army and promoted the slogan ‘lose the fear, take the smear’. 

Natasha Sale (pictured, with her four children) was described as an inspiration for her campaigning 

Natasha Sale (pictured, with her four children) was described as an inspiration for her campaigning 

Mrs Sale (pictured) has died just days after turning 31

Mrs Sale (pictured) has died just days after turning 31

Natasha Sale (pictured, right, and, left, with her four children) was described as an inspiration for her campaigning 

They described Mrs Sale as ‘inspirational and brave’. Amanda Scott wrote online that Mrs Sale was a ‘warrior who fought long and hard’.

‘It absolutely breaks my heart to be writing this and never thought in a million years you’d be taken from us my beautiful best friend Natasha grew her wings and passed away peacefully 6:08am yesterday surrounded by the people who truly loved her,’ she wrote. We have grown up since nursery my true life long friend. 

‘I still can’t get my head around it and doesn’t seem real, God only takes the best and you was an absolute warrior you fought long and hard and proved many wrong time and time again.

Mrs Sale (pictured) fought hard and her petition has garnered 78,000 petitions - just 22,000 shy of what it needs to be discussed in Parliament 

Mrs Sale (pictured) fought hard and her petition has garnered 78,000 petitions - just 22,000 shy of what it needs to be discussed in Parliament 

Mrs Sale (pictured) fought hard and her petition has garnered 78,000 petitions – just 22,000 shy of what it needs to be discussed in Parliament 

‘You were an inspiration and such a caring beautiful women, always helping others and worried about others more then yourself when you were going through such a tough time.

‘You were the best mother to your four beautiful children who will never forget you and will always be reminded of what a legend you were.

‘I have many years of memories I will forever cherish, I’ve been privileged to have you as my best friend and having you in my life. 

‘I could write so many things but everyone already knows what a woman you are, sleep tight my beautiful angel.’ 

Natasha Sale (pictured) bravely battled the disease while also using the few months she had left to campaign for reform

Natasha Sale (pictured) bravely battled the disease while also using the few months she had left to campaign for reform

Natasha Sale (pictured) bravely battled the disease while also using the few months she had left to campaign for reform 

She leaves behind husband Dean and children Josh, 12, Ella, 11, Lily, nine and four-year-old Oakley.

Mrs Sale described her children’s bravery as she neared the end, saying: ‘They are fantastic. 

‘They respect it when I’m not feeling well and keep the noise down and are being so positive.’ 

In her last public Facebook post in August last year she wrote: ‘I started it to raise awareness of symptoms of cervical cancer and to prevent all ladies going through what I’ve been through so far.

‘I have 12-15 months and I’m leaving behind 4 beautiful children. I hope that in making this petition all ladies in the future will not have to be in my position, they will detect cell changes early and prevent cervical cancer full stop.

‘Please can everyone sign and share far and wide I need another 3500 odd signatures for the government to take notice. Please can everyone help me x’

Before she underwent surgery to remove a tumour on her lung in September 2017 she again urged all woman to take five minutes out to get a smear test done at the doctors so they wouldn’t have to suffer the way she was.

The brave mother of four (pictured in hospital) has died just six days after celebrating her 31st birthday 

The brave mother of four (pictured in hospital) has died just six days after celebrating her 31st birthday 

The brave mother of four (pictured in hospital) has died just six days after celebrating her 31st birthday 

She wrote: ‘As I embark on another surgery tomorrow morning to extend my life, to give me more time with my babies and family friends and loved ones, i’d like to share again awareness for cervical cancer.. ladies please get your smears done!

‘Tomorrow I’m having surgery on my lung to remove a tumour, I’ll be put to sleep, placed in a ct scanner have a needle put through my chest inserted into my lung next to the tumour then have it heated up to destroy the tumour and the cancerous cells.

‘There is a high chance my lung will collapse and there will be permanent damage due to the location of the tumour, making me short of breath, never mind other possible complications.

‘If you look at what I’ve been through so far and what’s yet to come ask yourself is it worth it? Putting it off like I did… no it’s not!

‘Think of your partner, children, mum, dad, siblings and friends would they want you to go through this, to watch you in my situation all for five mins at the drs?

‘Please book your test if you’re due one soon, pretty please do it for me.’

You can help Mrs Sale’s campaign to lower the cervical cancer screening age by signing her petition here.  

WHAT IS CERVICAL CANCER? AND HOW DO SMEARS TESTS WORK? 

Jade Goody (pictured) died of cervical cancer aged just 27 after she was 'too scared' to go for a smear test 

Jade Goody (pictured) died of cervical cancer aged just 27 after she was 'too scared' to go for a smear test 

Jade Goody (pictured) died of cervical cancer aged just 27 after she was ‘too scared’ to go for a smear test 

 A smear test detects abnormal cells on the cervix, which is the entrance to the uterus from the vagina. 

Removing these cells can prevent cervical cancer.

Most test results come back clear, however, one in 20 women show abnormal changes to the cells of their cervix. 

Being screened regularly means any abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix can be identified at an early stage and, if necessary, destroyed to stop cancer developing.

Reality TV star Jade Goody died aged 27 of cervical cancer despite having an abnormal smear result 11 years before.

After having precancerous cells removed, she was urged to go back to the hospital. But she famously ignored it, later telling Heat magazine: ‘I was too scared.’  

Cervical cancer most commonly affects sexually-active women aged between 30 and 45.

In the UK, the NHS Cervical Screening Programme invites women aged 25-to-49 for a smear every three years, those aged 50 to 60 every five years, and women over 65 if they have not been screened since 50 or have previously had abnormal results.

Women must be registered with a GP to be invited for a test.

In the US, tests start when women turn 21 and are carried out every three years until they reach 65.

Changes in cervical cells are often caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV), which can be transmitted during sex. 

 

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