Janet Street-Porter has appeared on This Morning with a large plaster across her nose after having a skin cancer growth removed.

The presenter, 73, smiled as she reassured the show’s hosts Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield that although her bandage looked ‘frightening’ she was ‘fine’.

She explained how she had the procedure a week ago, after having to wait four months due to the coronavirus lockdown delaying her appointment. 

'I'm fine!': Janet Street-Porter, 73, has appeared on This Morning with a large plaster across her nose after having a skin cancer growth removed last week

'I'm fine!': Janet Street-Porter, 73, has appeared on This Morning with a large plaster across her nose after having a skin cancer growth removed last week

‘I’m fine!’: Janet Street-Porter, 73, has appeared on This Morning with a large plaster across her nose after having a skin cancer growth removed last week

Janet said: ‘I had a small basal cell carcinoma, a skin cancer growth, taken off my nose a week ago. 

‘I’m going to be lifting the plaster off and talking about it on Loose Women on Wednesday but I’m fine.’

The presenter even joked about her plaster, revealing that she changed it specially for her This Morning appearance on Monday.

She said: ‘I did have a white plaster on and I thought this one was a bit more aesthetically pleasing, but now I can see myself, it looks frightening!’  

Recovering: The presenter even joked about her plaster, revealing she changed it specially for her TV appearance and added that she'll be taking it off before Loose Women on Wednesday

Recovering: The presenter even joked about her plaster, revealing she changed it specially for her TV appearance and added that she'll be taking it off before Loose Women on Wednesday

Recovering: The presenter even joked about her plaster, revealing she changed it specially for her TV appearance and added that she’ll be taking it off before Loose Women on Wednesday

Checking in: This Morning hosts Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby along with Matthew Wright checked Janet was ok when the segment started and she soon had them smiling

Checking in: This Morning hosts Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby along with Matthew Wright checked Janet was ok when the segment started and she soon had them smiling

Checking in: This Morning hosts Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby along with Matthew Wright checked Janet was ok when the segment started and she soon had them smiling

It comes after Janet revealed she was diagnosed with basal cell carcinoma after a trip to Australia, initially thinking the spot on her nose was an insect bite. 

She was shocked to discover it was cancer because she is ‘militant’ about sun protection, and ‘always’ uses factor 50 sun cream. 

The presenter had an appointment booked to remove the cancer three days before Britain went into lockdown in March. 

However the operation was delayed until last Wednesday, and she admitted how she became ‘more and more anxious’ about the carcinoma. 

All is well: Janet has previously admitted that she originally thought the spot was an insect bite

All is well: Janet has previously admitted that she originally thought the spot was an insect bite

All is well: Janet has previously admitted that she originally thought the spot was an insect bite

She said: ‘I showed this tiny spot on my nose to a dermatologist and he immediately referred me to a consultant. 

‘He said I had a basal cell carcinoma which is a form of skin cancer which has to be removed, if I don’t will get bigger and bigger and I could be left with a very big scar.’ 

The non-melanoma skin cancer grows underneath the skin and is mainly caused by overexposure to UV light from the sun or tanning beds, and Janet admitted she originally thought the spot was an insect bite. 

She said: ‘About four months ago, it was just after Christmas, I came back from Australia. I noticed this spot on my nose, I just thought was an insect bite. 

WHAT IS BASAL CELL CARCINOMA?

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a type of non-melanoma skin cancer.

Non-melanoma means it does not involve skin pigment cells.  

BCC often appears as scabs that bleed

BCC often appears as scabs that bleed

BCC often appears as scabs that bleed

BCC makes up more than 80 per cent of all forms of skin cancer in the UK, with over 100,000 new cases being diagnosed every year.

It is mainly caused by overexposure to UV light from the sun or tanning beds. 

BCC can occur anywhere on the body but is most common on areas exposed to the sun, such as the face, neck and ears.

The following people are most at risk:

  • People with fair skin or hair
  • Those who work outdoors
  • People who use sunbeds
  • Those with a personal history of the condition

BCC is usually painless. Early symptoms often only include a scab that bleeds occasionally and does not heal.

Some appear as flat, red, scaly marks or have a pearl-like rim. The latter can then erode into a ulcer.

Others are lumpy with shiny nodules crossed by blood vessels.

Most BCCs can be cured, however, treatment is complex if they are left for a long time. 

Treatment usually involves removing the cancerous tumour and some of the surrounding skin.

Source: British Skin Foundation and NHS Choices 

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‘I didn’t think anything of it, I have regular check ups for all my moles and I am very anxious of cancer.

‘I spend a lot of time outside and I have a friend who died of skin cancer a few years ago, so i’m really militant about it. ‘ 

She explained that after ‘weeks of badgering’ her delayed appointment was finally set to take place and admitted that despite her procedure having a 99 per cent success rate, the operation has been ‘playing on her nerves’. 

Delays: The presenter had an appointment booked to remove the cancer three days before Britain went into lockdown in March

Delays: The presenter had an appointment booked to remove the cancer three days before Britain went into lockdown in March

Delays: The presenter had an appointment booked to remove the cancer three days before Britain went into lockdown in March

‘I was going to have it removed but then lockdown happened,’ said Janet, ‘Three days before I was going to have it removed. So I spent the whole of lockdown getting more and more anxious about it. 

‘Because although it doesn’t look bigger, this kind of cancer grows under the skin so you can’t see it. On Wednesday finally after weekly badgering, my surgeon said I could have the operation. 

‘It’s a local anaesthetic, where the surgeon takes a slither of the cancer and then analyses it while you’re there. So they only take out exactly what they have to take out and you know what’s going on.

‘That has a 99 per cent success rate and leaves the smallest scar. It has really been playing on my nerves, and i’m someone who always puts factor 50 on my nose.’ 

Shock:  Janet said she developed skin cancer despite being 'militant' about sun protection and 'always' using factor 50 sun cream

Shock:  Janet said she developed skin cancer despite being 'militant' about sun protection and 'always' using factor 50 sun cream

Shock:  Janet said she developed skin cancer despite being ‘militant’ about sun protection and ‘always’ using factor 50 sun cream

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