Paloma Faith has bravely spoke about her battle with postnatal depression and struggle to adapt to being a mother to her now three-year-old daughter.

In a new candid interview, the British singer, 38, revealed that she had expected to take to motherhood ‘like a duck to water’ but the reality was a rude awakening. 

She told the Mirror: ‘And then I had my baby and lots of things went wrong and I was sadder than I’ve ever been before and I felt broken, largely by the disappointment that I wasn’t the mother that I thought I’d be.’

Brave: Paloma Faith has bravely spoke about her battle with postnatal depression and struggle to adapt to being a mother to her now three-year-old daughter (Pictured in 2017)

Brave: Paloma Faith has bravely spoke about her battle with postnatal depression and struggle to adapt to being a mother to her now three-year-old daughter (Pictured in 2017)

Brave: Paloma Faith has bravely spoke about her battle with postnatal depression and struggle to adapt to being a mother to her now three-year-old daughter (Pictured in 2017)

The Picking Up the Pieces singer revealed that it took time for a bond to develop with her child, who she conceived via IVF with her partner Leyman Lahcine.

The singer was so distressed that she began questioning whether she had given birth to another couple’s baby fearing a mix up at the IVF clinic. 

Paloma said: ‘I started emailing doctors saying, ‘Is there any way you might have put the wrong embryo in me?’ But now you can see it, our child exactly looks like us.’

The star happily shared that she now shares a special connection with her toddler, who is ‘a bit obsessed’ with her famous mother. 

Distressed: In a new candid interview, the British singer, 38, revealed that she had expected to take to motherhood 'like a duck to water' but the reality was a rude awakening

Distressed: In a new candid interview, the British singer, 38, revealed that she had expected to take to motherhood 'like a duck to water' but the reality was a rude awakening

Distressed: In a new candid interview, the British singer, 38, revealed that she had expected to take to motherhood ‘like a duck to water’ but the reality was a rude awakening 

Proud parents: The Picking Up the Pieces singer revealed that it took time for a bond to develop with her child, who she conceived via IVF with her partner Leyman Lahcine (Pictured in 2018)

Proud parents: The Picking Up the Pieces singer revealed that it took time for a bond to develop with her child, who she conceived via IVF with her partner Leyman Lahcine (Pictured in 2018)

Proud parents: The Picking Up the Pieces singer revealed that it took time for a bond to develop with her child, who she conceived via IVF with her partner Leyman Lahcine (Pictured in 2018)

Award-winning singer Paloma went on to say that the approval of strangers is a large part of being a musician, but that pales in comparison to the validation she gets from her daughter, whose name she has not disclosed. 

Last week, Paloma refuted claims that she was raising her child as gender neutral in a interview with the Radio Times, but confirmed that she doesn’t encourage gender rigidity with toys or activities, allowing her daughter to be her own person.

She said: ‘I wanted her to develop into herself before the world decided who she was. I felt like a lioness. She makes me look at the world in a way I’ve neglected for a long time.’ 

Her appreciation of emerging personalities and talent is one of Paloma’s key skills as  a judge on ITV’s The Voice Kids, which she presents alongside Will.i.am, Pixie Lott and McFly’s Danny Jones.

In Saturday’s show, viewers were left sobbing as a blind 13-year-old girl stunned the famous vocal coaches with her phenomenal singing voice. 

Lydia from Worcester sang a stunning rendition of Your Song, based on Ellie Goulding’s cover of the Elton John song which left those watching taking to social media to brand her ‘an inspiration’. 

Clarification: Paloma shot down claims that she's raising her three-year-old daughter gender neutral last week, days after finally revealing her child is a girl (Pictured in September)

Clarification: Paloma shot down claims that she's raising her three-year-old daughter gender neutral last week, days after finally revealing her child is a girl (Pictured in September)

Clarification: Paloma shot down claims that she’s raising her three-year-old daughter gender neutral last week, days after finally revealing her child is a girl (Pictured in September)

WHAT IS POSTNATAL DEPRESSION?

Postnatal depression is a form of the mental-health condition that affects more than one in 10 women in the UK and US within a year of giving birth.

As many men can be affected as women, research suggests.  

Many parents feel down, teary and anxious within the first two weeks of having a child, which is often called the ‘baby blues’.

But if symptoms start later or last longer, they may be suffering from postnatal depression.

Postnatal depression is just as serious as others form of the mental-health disorder. 

Symptoms include:

  • Persistent sadness
  • Lack of enjoyment or interest in the wider world
  • Fatigue
  • Insomnia
  • Struggling to bond with your baby
  • Withdrawing from others
  • Difficulty concentrating and making decisions
  • Frightening thoughts, such as hurting your baby

Sufferers should not wait for their symptoms to just go away.

Instead they should recognise that it is not their fault they are depressed and it does not make them a bad parent.

If you or your partner may be suffering, talk to your GP or health visitor.

Treatments can include self-help, such as talking to loved ones, resting when you can and making time to do things you enjoy. Therapy may also be prescribed. 

In severe cases where other options have not helped, antidepressants may be recommended. Doctors will prescribe ones that are safe to take while breastfeeding.

Postnatal depression’s cause is unclear, however, it is more common in those with a history of mental-health problems. 

Lack of support from loved ones, a poor relationship with the partner and a life-changing event, such as bereavement, can also raise the risk. 

Source: NHS

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